Nancy Campbell wins Ness Award for the popularisation of geography through poetry and non-fiction writing

Poetry Society Member Nancy Campbell is the recipient of the Royal Geographic Society’s Ness Award for the popularisation of geography through poetry and non-fiction writing.

These are part of a series of awards that recognise extraordinary achievement in geographical research, fieldwork, teaching, policy, and public engagement.

Nancy says on Twitter:

“Honoured to receive this year’s Ness Award from the inspirational @RGS_IBG. Many thanks to @DGALitAgents, my publishers and everyone who travelled with me across ice & water & by road & rail.”

As Canal Laureate – a role supported by The Poetry Society and the Canal & River Trust – Nancy walked, paddled and cycled hundreds of miles along canals and towpaths in search of a poet’s subjects. She’s written dozens of poems and posts inspired by weather conditions, wildlife, wellness, and the passing of time. Navigations, recently published by Happenstance Press, is a pamphlet of her Laureate poems. The Poetry Society is planning an online event based on Nancy’s canal experience – more details soon.

Since 2010 Nancy has undertaken a series of residencies with research institutions in the Arctic and Scandinavia, which has resulted in several projects responding to the environment and water conservation. Her publications include a cultural history of ice, The Library of Ice: Readings in a Cold Climate (2018), Disko Bay (shortlisted for the Forward Prize for Best First Collection 2016 and the Michael Murphy Memorial Prize 2017) and How To Say ‘I Love You’ In Greenlandic (winner of the Birgit Skiöld Award 2013). She is based in Oxford, where she can often be found kayaking on the River Thames. www.nancycampbell.co.uk

Established in 2013 by The Poetry Society and the Canal & River Trust as part of the national Arts on the Waterways programme, the Canal Laureateship aims to encourage exciting new writing about the Britain’s historic canal network. Previous Laureateships have seen poems stencilled onto canalside walls, carved into newly made lock-beams, and translated into short films; with forgotten classics given new life in performances, publication and animations.

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19 May 2020