Catherine Eddowes’ tin box as a key witness

Emma Purshouse

Please, don’t ask me, sir.
I wasn’t the only tin box, sir.
The mustard tin she carried her pawn tickets in.
Please, sir, don’t ask me to say what I saw,

I wasn’t the only tin box there, sir.
There was one of tea, another of matches.
Please, sir, don’t ask me to say what I saw.
Ask the two small bags of bed ticking, they’ll tell you, sir.

Yes, one of tea, another of matches.
Yes, a mustard tin, and me she kept her sugar in.
Ask the two small bags of bed ticking they’ll tell you, sir,
or the needles in the red flannel, they saw it too.

Yes, a mustard tin. And me she kept her sugar in.
So many witnesses, sir. Saw it all with their own eyes,
the needles in the red flannel, sir. Yes, they saw it too, sir.
Ask the clay pipes, and the small tooth comb.

So many witnesses, sir. Saw it all with our own eyes.
Ask the metal teaspoon, and the white-handled knife.
Yes, two clay pipes, and a small tooth comb.
Ask the ball of hemp, the six pieces of soap.

Yes, a metal teaspoon, and a white-handled knife.
Ask the 12 menstrual rags, the thimble, the button.
Yes, a ball of hemp, and six pieces of soap, sir.
Or the red mitten, and the broken spectacles, ask them, sir.

12 pieces of menstrual rag, yes. Thimble and button,
they were there, sir, with the coarse white linen.
Yes, a red mitten, and broken spectacles. Ask them.
Or the three-cornered blue and white shirting,

yes, they were there, sir, with the coarse white linen
and the old apron. The old apron with a repair, sir.
There with the three-cornered blue and white shirting.
And the cigarette case, made of red leather.

Yes, an old apron. Old apron with a repair, sir.
Ask the handbill, and Frank Carter’s card.
Yes, a cigarette case. Of red leather, sir.
We were all of us there, sir.

Yes, a handbill, and Frank Carter’s card.
Please don’t ask me, sir. Ask one of them.
Yes, they were all of them there, sir.
Dumbstruck I am. No words to say what I saw.